Tag Archives: the humble humanist

EAT

I’ve mentioned here before that Ron was the first blogger I began following.  Heretofore I’ve concerned myself almost exclusively with Where the Rubber Meets the Road, his thinking blog.

One day Ron posted a poem, and it was beautiful.  He kept writing them and posting them, and then he decided that he may as well use a different blog for his poetry since it was taking on such a magnificent life of its own.

Poetry for me is like comedy.  It’s really hard to nail.  I can’t stand cheese.  I cringe at forced sentiment.  And as a sufferer of energetic tackiness, I get really uncomfortable when people try too hard.

Ron’s poetry is guilty of none of those things.  It is honest and pure and communicates to a part of my brain that responds comfortably and curiously.  I often read a poem, walk away, and then come back and read it again, because there’s more to be had from them than can be taken in a single sitting.  But they’re very digestible in one go, as well…I’ve really been impressed.

And now he’s outdone himself.  This last poem was so excellent…It has been some time since so few words so quickly transported me to another place entirely.  I was reminded of Cohen and Waits and I think that at the very least, you’re going to really enjoy it.  Hungry?  Then,

EAT.

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What a whole lotta love.

It’s more than a little interesting to consider all the knock-on effects of any new given thing we choose to do, or to stop doing, or to change.  For instance:  we left England because we wanted to spend a year volunteering, without the hassle of balancing work alongside our donated time.  We also wanted to explore new career opportunities, to see if there was anything in those new roles we wanted to hold tight.

Some of the outcomes were extraordinary.  Some were disappointing.  Some we haven’t fully absorbed intellectually or emotionally as yet, and are still trying to piece together.

One of the more unexpected outcomes was the direction Chris and I have taken in our careers.  I had no plans at any point from roughly the age of 16 to try to write professionally, and yet here I am.  Chris had given up on the world of IT more or less right after the Dot Com Crash in the early Naughties, and yet here he is.

And, of course, there’s this blog – What If and Why Not – a question and a statement and a quest, I suppose – the brainchild of a childless-by-choice couple, born out of a need to update friends and family, to make sense of the crazy decision we’d just taken, and, eventually (particularly for me), to write.  What we didn’t expect was the community that would form around us:  bloggers we’ve come to admire and respect and learn from constantly, readers who would make a point of reading us virtually every time we posted.  We didn’t expect that perfect strangers thousands of miles away would be able to raise our spirits, give us food for thought, empathise and propose solutions.

One such extraordinary character can be found here on WordPress.  She goes by Colgore on here, but I’m pretty sure most folks call her Coleen.  She’s a yoga instructor by day and a word whittler by night (or the other way around?  I’m not sure.  Time differences, you know), and she absolutely. Cracks. Me. Up.  She also makes me think, and she also comes over here to What If and Why Not to make us feel good about what we’ve got going on.  What she’s got going on is called Prana and Peaches, and for whatever reason, she digs us enough to have nominated us for a bright and shiny:

Isn’t it purdy?

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Shouting out.

As you may have noticed, we keep a blogroll on our WI&WN blog.  That’s nothing special – lots of bloggers keep a list of blogs on their page.  Others opt not to…maybe they worry about burdening their readers with their opinions…hahaha.

OK – bad humor aside, I just wanted to take a minute to draw your attention to our blogroll.  There’s some incredible stuff going on over there.  It’s listed alphabetically, so no preferential treatment involved…only that we’ve listed stuff we think you’re really going to like.

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